How You Can Better Manage Your Sleep Apnea

Have you developed a reputation as a snorer? Do you find it unusually difficult to get a good night’s sleep? Although you may not be aware of it, your sleeping difficulties may stem from sleep apnea, a serious health issue that makes it especially hard to get natural, restful sleep. If this sounds like your own situation, you need not worry. The ideas and advice in this article are going to make your day.

If you are over weight, going on a diet can reduce your sleep apnea, or in rare cases, eliminate it completely. Maintaining a healthy weight can help you breathe easier, so losing weight and maintaining a healthy weight when you have trouble breathing is an obvious step in treating your sleep apnea.

Check if a corrective device can help alleviate your sleep apnea symptoms. Having an overbite, an undersized jaw or a recessed chin can cause your airway to be more narrow because of how your jawbone is set. These devices help create proper alignment of your jaw while you sleep, opening up your airway more. As a result, you experience fewer sleep apnea symptoms.

If you have tried a number of less drastic sleep apnea treatment options, you might want to consider discussing surgical treatment options for the condition with your primary care physician. Sleep apnea treatment surgery often involves increasing the diameter of your airway in an effort to reduce the number of apnea episodes that you experience.

Losing weight can definitely help reduce sleep apnea’s effects. Those who are overweight usually suffer from sleep apnea due to the circumference of their neck. When you lose a few extra pounds you reduce the pressure on your airway and breathing becomes easier.

Don’t give up on treatment for sleep apnea after one doesn’t work. There are a variety of treatments for your condition, so finding the right one is sometimes a process of trial and error. The number and severity of your symptoms influence what treatment is correct one for you. Giving multiple treatments a chance ensures you find the one that works the most effectively.

If you suspect you have sleep apnea, ask your sleep partner to listen to your breathing while you sleep. See if they detect loud snoring as you get deeper into sleep. In addition, ask if they notice any periods when you appear to stop breathing for a time and then suddenly let out a loud snort and start breathing again. If you sleep alone, consider tape recording yourself to listen for these breathing abnormalities.

Even though you want to sleep better, do not take sleeping medication if you suffer from, or have a history of sleep apnea. What you may think will help will only make the condition worse by relaxing your muscles even more when you sleep. If you suffer from insomnia along with sleep apnea, speak with your doctor.

Sleep apnea has both multiple roots of origin and potential treatment vectors. Apply what you’ve just learned. You are on the journey to getting better sleep.